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Where Four Worlds Meet: Hindu Kush 1959 – Fosco Maraini (1964) (1st ed)

SG$56.00

Where Four Worlds Meet: Hindu Kush 1959 – Fosco Maraini (1964) (1st ed)

SG$56.00

Title: Where Four Worlds Meet: Hindu Kush, 1959

Author: Fosco Maraini, Peter Green (trans)

Publisher: Hamish Hamilton, London, 1964. First edition.

Condition: Hardcover, no dust jacket. Former library book, very good except for library markings. With numerous black-and-white photographs, and a foldout map. 290pp, app 9″ by 6″.

1 in stock

SKU: maraini-worlds Categories: , , Tag:

Contents:

  1. Karachi
  2. Interlude on Islam
  3. Some Talk of Alexander
  4. The Road from Peshawar
  5. Gujur and Chitral
  6. From Chitral to Base Camp
  7. The Advance from Base Camp
  8. The Final Assault
  9. On the Trail of Dionysus in Asia: An Epilogue on the Kalash Kafirs
    Essential data on the Expedition
    A Note on the British Expedition, Saraghrar, 1958
    Some books and articles on the Hindu Kush

About the author (from Wikipedia):

Fosco Maraini (15 November 1912 – 8 June 2004) was an Italian photographer, anthropologist, ethnologist, writer, mountaineer and academic.

As a photographer, Fosco Maraini is perhaps best known for his work in Tibet and Japan. The visual record Maraini captured in images of Tibet and on the Ainu people of Hokkaidō has gained significance as historical documentation of two disappearing cultures. His work was recognized with a 2002 award from the Photographic Society of Japan, citing his fine-art photos—and especially his impressions of Hokkaido’s Ainu. The society also acknowledged his efforts to strengthen ties between Japan and Italy over 60 years. Maraini also photographed extensively in the Karakoram and Hindu Kush mountain ranges of Central Asia, in Southeast Asia and in the southern regions of his native Italy.

As a mountaineer, he is perhaps best known for the 1959 ascent of Saraghrar and for his published accounts of this and other Himalayan climbs. As a climber in the Himalayas, he was moved to describe it as “the greatest museum of shape and form on earth.”