André Gide and the Crisis of Modern Thought – Klaus Mann (1943)

S$38.00

André Gide and the Crisis of Modern Thought – Klaus Mann (1943)

S$38.00

Title: André Gide and the Crisis of Modern Thought

Author: Klaus Mann

Publisher: Creative Age Press, 1943. Third printing.

Condition: Hardcover, no dust jacket. Good. Frontispiece missing, pages tanned. Inscription to ffep. Binding tight, text clean. 331pp., app 8″ by 5″.

1 in stock

SKU: gide-mann Categories: ,

Description

About André Gide (from Wikipedia):

André Paul Guillaume Gide (22 November 1869 – 19 February 1951) was a French author and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature (in 1947). Gide’s career ranged from its beginnings in the symbolist movement, to the advent of anticolonialism between the two World Wars. The author of more than fifty books, at the time of his death his obituary in The New York Times described him as “France’s greatest contemporary man of letters” and “judged the greatest French writer of this century by the literary cognoscenti.”

Known for his fiction as well as his autobiographical works, Gide exposes to public view the conflict and eventual reconciliation of the two sides of his personality (characterized by a Protestant austerity and a transgressive sexual adventurousness, respectively), which a strict and moralistic education had helped set at odds. Gide’s work can be seen as an investigation of freedom and empowerment in the face of moralistic and puritanical constraints, and centers on his continuous effort to achieve intellectual honesty. His self-exploratory texts reflect his search of how to be fully oneself, including owning one’s sexual nature, without at the same time betraying one’s values. His political activity is shaped by the same ethos, as indicated by his repudiation of communism after his 1936 voyage to the USSR.

About Klaus Mann (from Wikipedia):

Klaus Heinrich Thomas Mann (18 November 1906 – 21 May 1949) was a German writer.

Born in Munich, Klaus Mann was the son of German writer Thomas Mann and his wife, Katia Pringsheim. His father was baptized as a Lutheran, while his mother was from a family of secular Jews. He began writing short stories in 1924 and the following year became drama critic for a Berlin newspaper. His first literary works were published in 1925.

Mann’s early life was troubled. His homosexuality often made him the target of bigotry, and he had a difficult relationship with his father. After only a short time in various schools, he travelled with his sister Erika Mann, a year older than himself, around the world, visiting the US in 1927, and reporting about it in essays published as a collaborative travelogue in 1929.

candal surrounding it made Mann posthumously famous in West Germany, as Gründgens’ adopted son brought a legal case to have the novel banned after its first publication in West Germany in the early 1960s. After seven years of legal hearings, the West German Supreme Court banned it by a vote of three to three, although it continued to be available in East Germany and abroad. The ban was lifted and the novel published in West Germany in 1981.

Mann’s novel Der Vulkan is one of the 20th century’s most famous novels about German exiles during World War II.

He died in Cannes of an overdose of sleeping pills on 21 May 1949, after another drug treatment. The prolific writer likely committed suicide because of financial problems and social isolation. He was buried there in the Cimetière du Grand Jas.