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Correct Guide to Letter Writing by a Member of the Aristocracy

SG$78.00

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Correct Guide to Letter Writing by a Member of the Aristocracy

SG$78.00

Title: Correct Guide to Letter Writing
Author: “Member of the Aristocracy” True author is still unknown.
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co, Ninth edition. Exact date unknown, probably around 1895.
Condition: Hardcover, decorative cloth, well-bound, wi

Sold out!

SKU: correct-guide-letter-writing Categories: ,

Title: Correct Guide to Letter Writing
Author: “Member of the Aristocracy” True author is still unknown.
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co, Ninth edition. Exact date unknown, probably around 1895.
Condition: Hardcover, decorative cloth, well-bound, with some annotations inside. External is bright with mild soiling.

“The present Letter Writer is not intended to teach a flowery and ornamental style of letter writing, but to be a reliable guide to inexperienced letter writers in the construction of every description of letter under every possible circumstance. With this aim in view, we venture to place this work in the hands of our friends the public, and await their verdict with pleasurable expectation. ” – from the preface

A curious book written by an unknown hand – someone clearly cultured and wealthy, who has written other works such as “Manners and Rules of Good Society” and “Society Small Talk”. Clearly steeped in stuffy Victorianism, this book is a guide to writing a formal letter to almost any conceivable contact in every conceivable circumstance.

Examples:

From a Gentleman, accepting an Invitation to Luncheon 
From a Gentleman, accepting an Invitation to a Picnic
From a Married Lady to another, inviting her to go to the Theatre 
From a Lady, postponing a Dinner Party on account of a Death 
From a Lady to a House Agent, asking for Particulars of Houses 
From a Gentleman to a House Furnisher, asking for Time in the Settlement of his Account
To the Wife of the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland
Form of Notice to Quit, from Landlord to Tenant

And many many others!

Example:

Unfavourable answer from a Lady respecting a Proposal of Marriage.

5, Tavistock Gardens, S.W.,

April 26th, 1884.

Deab Mr. Hart,

Your letter has occasioned me much pain, because I
feel I have but one answer to make to it. I wish for your
sake it were otherwise, but you must only think of me as a
friend.

Greatly as I appreciate the honour you have done me in
asking me to become your wife, I still feel that I must
hold out no hope to you of such a possibility. I beg you
will accept this answer as final, and not press me for a
reason. I shall always value your friendship very highly,
and I trust that after a little time we may meet again as
friends, and that yon will forgive me for the disappoint-
ment of to-day, which I have so unwillingly caused you.
With best wishes for your happiness.

Believe me yours,

Very sincerely,

Lucy Clarke.