Don Quixote – Cervantes (1890)

S$42.00

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Don Quixote – Cervantes (1890)

S$42.00

Title: The Adventures of Don Quixote

Author: Miguel de Cervantes, Motteux (trans)

Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co. No date, research reveals it to be circa 1890.

Condition: Hardcover, cloth. Fair. Covers slightly bent and cocked, spine faded. Spine cloth missing to about 1″ of the edge of back cover, exposing boards slightly. Slight foxing. Inscription to title page and the top of the first page. Text clean (but very small), binding tight. 567pp., app 7″ x 4.5″.

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SKU: warne-donquixote Categories: ,

Description

About the book (from Wikipedia):

Don Quixote is a Spanish novel by Miguel de Cervantes. It was originally published in two parts, in 1605 and 1615. Considered a founding work of Western literature, it is often labeled “the first modern European novel” and many authors consider it to be the one of the greatest novels ever written. Don Quixote also holds the distinction of being the eleventh most-translated book in the world, the first being the Bible.

The plot revolves around the adventures of a noble (hidalgo) from La Mancha named Alonso Quixano, who reads so many chivalric romances that he loses his mind and decides to become a knight-errant (caballero andante) to revive chivalry and serve his nation, under the name Don Quixote de la Mancha. He recruits a simple farmer, Sancho Panza, as his squire, who often employs a unique, earthy wit in dealing with Don Quixote’s rhetorical monologues on knighthood, already considered old-fashioned at the time. Don Quixote, in the first part of the book, does not see the world for what it is and prefers to imagine that he is living out a knightly story.

The book had a major influence on the literary community, as evidenced by direct references in Alexandre Dumas’ The Three Musketeers (1844), Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884), and Edmond Rostand’s Cyrano de Bergerac (1897), as well as the word quixotic and the epithet Lothario; the latter refers to a character in “El curioso impertinente” (“The Impertinently Curious Man”), an intercalated story that appears in Part One, chapters 33–35. The 19th-century German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer cited Don Quixote as one of the four greatest novels ever written.