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Essays: Literary, Moral and Political – David Hume (1870)

SG$83.00

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Essays: Literary, Moral and Political – David Hume (1870)

SG$83.00

Title: Essays: Literary, Moral and Political
Author: David Hume
ISBN: –
Publisher: George Routledge & Sons, 1870 (a part of Sir John Lubbock’s 100 Books)
Condition: Hardcover, 3/4 leather with marbled boards. Some rubbing and wear, but firmly bound, t

Sold out!

SKU: hume-essays Categories: , ,

Title: Essays: Literary, Moral and Political
Author: David Hume
ISBN: –
Publisher: George Routledge & Sons, 1870 (a part of Sir John Lubbock’s 100 Books)
Condition: Hardcover, 3/4 leather with marbled boards. Some rubbing and wear, but firmly bound, text clean and unmarked. Good.

Contents

Essay I. Of a Delicacy of Taste and Passion     9 – 11

II. Of the Liberty of the Press     11- 13

III. That Politics may be reduced to a Science     13- 22

IV. Of the First Principles of Government     23 – 25

V. Of the Origin of Government     25- 28

VI. Of the Independency of Parliament     28- 31

VII. Whether the British Government inclines more
to absolute Monarchy, or to a Republic     31- 35

VIII. Of Parties in General     35- 40

IX. Of the Parties of Great Britain     40- 45

X. Of the Dignity or Meanness of Human Nature     45- 49

XI. Of Civil Liberty     49- 55

XII. Of Eloquence     55- 63

XIII. Of the Rise and Progress of the Arts and
Sciences     63- 79

XIV. The Epicurean     79- 84

XV. The Stoic     84- 90

XVI. The Platonist     90- 93

XVII. The Sceptic     93- 107

XVIII. Of Polygamy and Divorces     107- 113

XIX. Of Simplicity and Refinement in Writing     113- 116

XX. Of National Characters     116- 127

XXI. Of Tragedy     127- 133

XXII. Of the Standard of Taste     134 – 149

XXIII. Of Commerce     149- 158

XXIV. Of Refinement in the Arts     159 – 167

XXV. Of Money     167- 175

XXVI. Of Interest     176 – 184

XXVII. Of the Balance of Trade     184- 195

XXVIII. Of the Jealousy of Trade     195- 198

XXIX. Of the Balance of Power     198- 203

XXX. Of Taxes     203- 207

XXXI. Of Public Credit     207- 217

XXXII. Of some Remarkable Customs     217- 222

XXXIII. Of the Populousness of Ancient Nations     222- 269

XXXIV. Of the Original Contract     270 – 283

XXXV. Of Passive Obedience     283- 286

XXXVI. Of the Coalition of Parties     286- 291

XXXVII. Of the Protestant Succession     291- 298

XXXVIII. Idea of a Perfect Commonwealth     298- 308

XXXIX. AN ENQUIRY CONCERNING HUMAN UNDERSTANDING.    

Sect. I. Of the different species of Philosophy     308- 316

II. Of the Origin of Ideas     316- 320

III. Of the Association of Ideas     320- 321

IV. Sceptical Doubts concerning the Operations of
Understanding     321 – 331

V. Sceptical Solution of these Doubts     331- 341

VI. Of Probability     341- 343

VII. Of the Idea of Necessary Connection     343- 355

VIII. Of Liberty and Necessity     356 – 371

IX. Of the Reason of Animals     371- 374

X. Of the Academical or Sceptical Philosophy     374- 385

XL. A DISSERTATION ON THE PASSIONS     385- 407

XLI. AN ENQUIRY CONCERNING THE PRINCIPLES OF MORALS.    

Sect. I. Of the general Principles of Morals     407- 411

II. Of Benevolence     411- 415

III. Of Justice     415- 429

IV. Of Political Society     429- 433

V. Why Utility pleases     433- 446

VI. Of Qualities useful to Ourselves     446- 456

VII. Of Qualities immediately agreeable to Ourselves     456- 463

VIII. Of Qualities immediately agreeable to Others     463- 467

IX. Conclusion     467- 478

Append. I. Concerning Moral Sentiment     478- 484

II. Of Self-love     484- 489

III. Some farther considerations with regard to
Justice     489- 494

IV. Of some Verbal Disputes     494- 501

XLII. A DIALOGUE     501- 514

XLIII. THE NATURAL HISTORY OF RELIGION. Introduction     514- 515

I. Polytheism was the Primary Religion of Men     515- 518

II. Origin of Polytheism     518- 520

III. The same Subject continued     520- 523

IV. Deities not considered as Creators or Formers
of the World     523- 527

V. Various Forms of Polytheism: Allegory, Hero-
Worship     527- 530

VI. Origin of Theism from Polytheism     530- 533

VII. Confirmation of this Doctrine     533- 534

VIII. Flux and Reflux of Polytheism and Theism     534- 536

IX. Comparison of these Religions with regard to
Persecution and Toleration     536- 538

X. With regard to Courage or Abasement     538- 539

XI. With regard to Reason or Absurdity     540 – 541

XII. With regard to Doubt or Conviction     541- 547

XIII. Conceptions of the Divine Nature in Religion     547- 549

XIV. Bad Influence of most Popular Religions on
Morality     550 – 551

XV. General Corollary     551- 552

OF MIRACLES     553 – 568

OF A PARTICULAR PROVIDENCE AND OF A FUTURE STATE     568- 579

OF SUPERSTITION AND ENTHUSIASM     579- 583

Excerpt

I. — OF THE DELICACY OF TASTE AND PASSION.

SOME people are subject to a certain delicacy of passion, which makes
them extremely sensible to all the accidents of life, and gives them a
lively joy upon every prosperous event, as well as a piercing grief, when
they meet with misfortunes and adversity. Favours and good offices
easily engage their friendship; while the smallest injury provokes their
resentment. Any honour or mark of distinction elevates them above
measure; but they are as sensibly touched with contempt. People of
this character have, no doubt, more lively enjoyments, as well as more
pungent sorrows, than men of cool and sedate tempers: but, I believe,
when everything is balanced, there is no one, who would not rather be
of the latter character, were he entirely master of his own disposition.
Good or ill fortune is very little at our disposal: and when a person,
that has this sensibility of temper, meets with any misfortune, his
sorrow or resentment takes entire possession of him, and deprives
him of all relish in the common occurrences of life; the right enjoy-
ment of which forms the chief part of our happiness. Great pleasures
are much less frequent than great pains; so that a sensible temper
must meet with fewer trials in the former way than in the latter. Not
to mention, that men of such lively passions are apt to be transported
beyond all bounds of prudence and discretion, and to take false steps
in the conduct of life, which are often irretrievable.

There is a delicacy of taste observable in some men, which very
much resembles this delicacy of passion, and produces the same sensi-
bility to beauty and deformity of every kind, as that does to prosperity
and adversity, obligations and injuries. When you present a poem or
a picture to a man possessed of this talent, the delicacy of his feelings
makes him be sensibly touched with every part of it; nor are the
masterly strokes perceived with more exquisite relish and satisfaction,
than the negligences or absurdities with disgust and uneasiness. A
polite and judicious conversation affords him the highest entertain-
ment; rudeness or impertinence is as great a punishment to him. In
short, delicacy of taste has the same effect as delicacy of passion: it
enlarges the sphere both of our happiness and misery, and makes us    
sensible to the pains as well as to the pleasures, which escape the
rest of mankind.