Hindu Colonies in the Far East – R. C. Majumdar

S$120.00

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Hindu Colonies in the Far East – R. C. Majumdar

S$120.00

An accomplished Indian historian writes about Hindu Southeast-Asia. A fairly detailed account.

Title: Hindu Colonies in the Far East

Author: R. C. Majumdar

Publisher: Firma K. L. Mukhopadhyay, 1963. Second edition, revised and enlarged.

Condition: Hardcover, with dust jacket. Very good. Some wear to price-clipped dust jacket. Interior very good, with black-and-white plates and a small foldout map. 280pp excluding plates. App 9″ by 6″.

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SKU: majumdar-hinducolonies Categories: , , ,

Description

Contents include:

Suvarnadvipa:

Early Hindu Colonies – Malay Peninsula, Java, Sumatra, Borneo, Bali, Hindu Civilisation
The Sailendras
Java (Mataram, Kadiri, Majapahit, etc)
The End of Hindu Rule in Suvarnadvipa
Progress of Hindu Civilisation

Champa:

The Foundation of the Hindu Kingdom of Champa
The Early Hindu Dynasties
The Annamite Conquest of Champa
Administrative System
Indian Culture in Champa
Art

Kambuja

Fu-nan, the Earliest Hindu Empire
The Rise of Angkor
The Kambuja Empire
The Hindu Culture in Kambuja

Burma and Thailand

Beginnings of Indian Colonisation in Burma
The Early Hindu Kingdoms in Burma
The Arimardanapura Empire
The Thais

About the author (from Wikipedia):

Ramesh Chandra Majumdar (known as R. C. Majumdar; 4 December 1884 – 11 February 1980) was a historian and professor of Indian history.

Majumdar started his research on ancient India. After extensive travels to Southeast Asia and research, he wrote detailed histories of Champa (1927), Suvarnadvipa (1929) and Kambuja Desa. On the initiative of Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan, he took up the mantle of editing a multi-volume tome on Indian history. Starting in 1951, he toiled for twenty six long years to describe the history of the Indian people from the Vedic Period to the present day in eleven volumes. In 1955, Majumdar establishes the College of Indology of Nagpur University and joined as principal. In 1958-59, he taught Indian history in the University of Chicago and University of Pennsylvania. He was also the president of the Asiatic Society (1966–68) and the Bangiya Sahitya Parishad (1968–69), also the Sheriff of Calcutta (1967–68).