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History of the Conquest of Mexico (1897)

S$98.00

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History of the Conquest of Mexico (1897)

S$98.00

Title: History of the Conquest of Mexico, with a preliminary view of ancient Mexican civilization and Life of the Conqueror, Hernando Cortes
Author: William H. Prescott
Publisher: Swann Sonnenschein & Co. No date, but prize plate dated 1897.
Condition:

Sold out!

SKU: conquestofmexico-prescott Categories: ,

Title: History of the Conquest of Mexico, with a preliminary view of ancient Mexican civilization and Life of the Conqueror, Hernando Cortes
Author: William H. Prescott
Publisher: Swann Sonnenschein & Co. No date, but prize plate dated 1897.
Condition: Full leather, raised bands on spine. School prize binding. About 1 cm of cover split from spine at the top, but still firmly bound. School prize plate on end papers. Foxing on fly pages. Text clean. Marbled edges and end papers.

About the book (from Goodreads):

“It is a magnificent epic,” said William H. Prescott after the publication of History of the Conquest of Mexico in 1843. Since then, his sweeping account of Cortés’s subjugation of the Aztec people has endured as a landmark work of scholarship and dramatic storytelling. This pioneering study presents a compelling view of the clash of civilizations that reverberates in Latin America to this day.

“Regarded simply from the standpoint of literary criticism, the Conquest of Mexico is Prescott’s masterpiece,” judged his biographer Harry Thurston Peck. “More than that, it is one of the most brilliant examples which the English language possesses of literary art applied to historical narration. . . . Here, as nowhere else, has Prescott succeeded in delineating character. All the chief actors of his great historic drama not only live and breathe, but they are as distinctly differentiated as they must have been in life. Cortés and his lieutenants are persons whom we actually come to know in the pages of Pres-cott. . . . Over against these brilliant figures stands the melancholy form of Montezuma, around whom, even from the first, one feels gathering the darkness of his coming fate. He reminds one of some hero of Greek tragedy, doomed to destruction and intensely conscious of it, yet striving in vain against the decree of an inexorable destiny. . . . [Prescott] transmuted the acquisitions of laborious research into an enduring monument of pure literature.”

About Prescott (from Wikipedia):

William Hickling Prescott (May 4, 1796 – January 28, 1859) was an American historian and Hispanist, who is widely recognized by historiographers to have been the first American scientific historian. Despite suffering from serious visual impairment, which at times prevented him from reading or writing for himself, Prescott became one of the most eminent historians of 19th century America. He is also noted for his eidetic memory.

After an extensive period of study, during which he sporadically contributed to academic journals, Prescott specialized in late Renaissance Spain and the early Spanish Empire. His works on the subject, The History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella the Catholic (1837), The History of the Conquest of Mexico (1843), A History of the Conquest of Peru (1847) and the unfinished History of the Reign of Phillip II (1856–1858) have become classic works in the field, and have had a great impact on the study of both Spain and Mesoamerica. During his lifetime, he was upheld as one of the greatest living American intellectuals, and knew personally many of the leading political figures of the day, in both the United States and Britain. Prescott has become one of the most widely translated American historians, and was an important figure in the development of history as a rigorous academic discipline. Historians admire Prescott for his exhaustive, careful, and systematic use of archives, his accurate recreation of sequences of events, his balanced judgments and his lively writing style. He was primarily focused on political and military affairs, largely ignoring economic, social, intellectual, and cultural forces that in recent decades historians have focused on. Instead, he wrote narrative history, subsuming unstated causal forces in his driving storyline.