Indian Myth and Legend – Donald Mackenzie (1913) (1st ed)

S$98.00

Indian Myth and Legend – Donald Mackenzie (1913) (1st ed)

S$98.00

Title: Indian Myth and Legend
Author: Donald Alexander Mackenzie, With Illustrations in Colour by Warwick Goble and numerous monochrome Plates
Publisher: Gresham Publishing Company, 1913. First edition.
Condition: Hardcover, green cloth. Good. Covers somewhat worn, with small closed tears to top and bottom of spine cloth. Spine sunned. Ffep missing. Slight foxing to book, slight sagging to spine. With colour and black-and-white plates. 463pp. 8.5″5.5″. Overseas shipping will cost extra.

1 in stock

SKU: indian-myth-legend-gresham Categories: , , , Tag:

From the Preface:

This volume deals with the myths and legends of India, which survive to us in the rich and abundant store-house of Sanskrit literature, and with the rise and growth of Brahmanism, Buddhism, Jainism, etc.

The reader is introduced to the various sacred works of the Hindus, including the ancient invocatory hymns of the four Vedas, the later speculative and expository “Forest Books” in which “the Absolute is grasped and proclaimed”, and those great epic poems the Rámáyana, which is three times longer than the Iliad, and the Máhábharata, which is four times longer than the Rámáyana.

In no other country have the national poets given fuller and finer expression to the beliefs and ideals and traditions of a people, or achieved as a result wider and more enduring fame. At the present day over two hundred million Hindus are familiar in varying degrees with the legendary themes and traditional beliefs which the ancient forest sages and poets of India invested with much beautiful symbolism, and used as mediums for speculative thought and profound spiritual teachings. The sacred books of India are to the Hindus what the Bible is to Christians. Those who read them, or hear them read, are believed to be assured of prosperity in this world and of salvation in the next.

To students of history, of ethnology, and of comparative religion they present features of peculiar interest, for they contain an elaborate sociology of the ancient Aryo-Indians, their political organizations, their codes of laws, their high ethical code, and above all their conceptions of God, the soul, and the Universe.

Contents:

 

CHAP.

INTRODUCTION

I.

INDRA, KING OF THE GODS

II.

THE GREAT VEDIC DEITIES

III.

YAMA, THE FIRST MAN, AND KING OF THE DEAD

IV.

DEMONS AND GIANTS AND FAIRIES

V.

SOCIAL AND RELIGIOUS DEVELOPMENTS OF THE VEDIC AGE

VI.

MYSTERIES OF CREATION, THE WORLD’S AGES, AND SOUL WANDERING

VII.

NEW FAITHS: VISHNU RELIGION, BUDDHISM, AND JAINISM

VIII.

DIVINITIES OF THE EPIC PERIOD

IX.

PRELUDE TO THE GREAT BHARATA WAR

X.

ROYAL RIVALS: THE PANDAVAS AND KAURAVAS

XI.

THE TOURNAMENT

XII.

FIRST EXILE OF THE PANDAVAS

XIII.

THE CHOICE OF DRAUPADI

XIV.

TRIUMPH OF THE PANDAVAS

XV.

THE GREAT GAMBLING MATCH

XVI.

SECOND EXILE OF THE PANDAVAS

XVII.

DEFIANCE OF DURYODHANA

XVIII.

THE BATTLE OF EIGHTEEN DAYS

XIX.

ATONEMENT AND THE ASCENT TO HEAVEN

XX.

NALA AND DAMAYANTI

XXI.

WANDERINGS IN THE FOREST

XXII.

NALA IN EXILE

XXIII.

THE HOMECOMING OF THE KING

XXIV.

STORY OF RAMA: HOW SITA WAS WON

XXV.

THE RAPE OF SITA

XXVI.

RAMA’S MISSION FULFILLED

INDEX