Java: The Garden of the East – Scidmore (1922)

S$85.00

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Java: The Garden of the East – Scidmore (1922)

S$85.00

Title: Java: The Garden of the East
Author: Eliza Ruhamah Scidmore
Publisher: The Century Co, New York, 1922.
Condition: Hardcover, former library book from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s Research Department. Fair. Rubbing and wear to cover, fading to spine. Some tanning. Usual library markings. With black and white plates.

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Description

About the book:

A fascinating book for anyone interested in 19th century Java, the discovery of monuments such as the Borobudur, early women explorers, or anyone who wants to own a piece of Metro Goldwyn Mayer.

Contents
Singapore and the Equator
In Java Major
HL Batatia Queen of the East
The Kampongs
To the Hills
A Dutch Sans Souci
In a Tropical Garden
The Culture System
The Culture System Continued
Sinagar
Plantation Life
Acriss tge Oreabger Regencies
To Tissak Malaya!
Prisoners of State at Boro Boedor
Boro Boedor
Boro Boedor and Mendoet
Brambanam
Solo: The City of the Susunhan
The Land of Kris and Sarong
Djokjakarta
Pakoe Alam: The Axis of the Universe
Tjilatjap, Chalachap, Chelachap
Garoet and Papanayang
“Salamat”!

About the author (from Wikipedia):

Eliza Ruhamah Scidmore (1856–1928) was an American writer, photographer and geographer, who became the first female board member of the National Geographic Society. She visited Japan many times between 1885 and 1928.

Scidmore was born October 14, 1856 in Clinton, Iowa. She attended Oberlin College. Her interest in travel was aided by her brother, George Hawthorne Scidmore, a career diplomat who served in the Far East from 1884 to 1922. Eliza was often able to accompany her brother on assignments and his diplomatic position gave her entree into regions inaccessible to ordinary travelers. She came up with the idea of planting cherry blossoms in the U.S., which can now be viewed at West Potomac Park and other areas of the capital, particularly during the National Cherry Blossom Festival.

Eastern travels resulted in Jinrikisha Days in Japan, published in 1891. It was followed by a short guidebook, Westward to the Far East (1892). A trip to Java resulted in Java, the Garden of the East (1897) and visits to China and India resulted in several National Geographic Magazine articles and two books, China, the Long-Lived Empire (1900), and Winter India (1903).