Jehol: City of Emperors – Sven Hedin (1932) (1st ed)

S$180.00

Jehol: City of Emperors – Sven Hedin (1932) (1st ed)

S$180.00

Title: Jehol, City of Emperors

Author: Sven Hedin

Publisher: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co., 1932. First English edition.

Condition: Hardcover, no dust jacket. Very good. Bookplate to endpaper. With black-and-white photographic plates. 278pp., app 10″ by 7″.

Description

About Jehol (from Wikipedia):

Chengde, formerly known as Jehol and Rehe, is a prefecture-level city in Hebei province, situated northeast of Beijing. It is best known as the site of the Mountain Resort, a vast imperial garden and palace formerly used by the Qing emperors as summer residence. The permanent resident population is approximately 3,473,200 in 2017.

Contents:

The Road to Jehol
The Potala
The Flight of the Torgot
The Hsin-Kung Temple Monastery
Some other Temples in Jehol
The Visit of the Tashi Lama to Jehol
K’ang-Hsi, The Found of the Summer Palace in Jehol
Ch’ien-Lung’s Court at the Summer Palace
Lord Macartney’s Embassy
Hsiang Fei, The Concubine of an Emperor
Ho Shen, An Emperor’s Favourite
Chia-Chi’ing’s Death in Jehol
Hsien-Feng’s Death in Jehol
Index of Persons
Index of Place

About the author (from Wikipedia):

Sven Anders Hedin (19 February 1865 – 26 November 1952) was a Swedish geographer, topographer, explorer, photographer, travel writer, and illustrator of his own works. During four expeditions to Central Asia, he made the Transhimalaya known in the West and located sources of the Brahmaputra, Indus and Sutlej Rivers. He also mapped lake Lop Nur, and the remains of cities, grave sites and the Great Wall of China in the deserts of the Tarim Basin. In his book Från pol till pol (From Pole to Pole), Hedin describes a journey through Asia and Europe between the late 1880s and the early 1900s. While traveling, Hedin visited Turkey, the Caucasus, Tehran, Iraq, lands of the Kyrgyz people and the Russian Far East, India, China and Japan. The posthumous publication of his Central Asia Atlas marked the conclusion of his life’s work.