Poems – Mao Tsetung (1976)

S$41.00

Sold out!

Poems – Mao Tsetung (1976)

S$41.00

Title: Poems
Author: Mao Tsetung
Publisher: Foreign Languages Press, China, 1976. First edition thus.
Condition: Hardcover, with dust jacket. Except for tiny tears to the top of dust jacket and foxing on top edge, in excellent condition.

Sold out!

SKU: maotsetung-poems Categories: , ,

Description

Title: Poems
Author: Mao Tsetung
Publisher: Foreign Languages Press, China, 1976. First edition thus.
Condition: Hardcover, with dust jacket. Except for tiny tears to the top of dust jacket and foxing on top edge, in excellent condition.

About the book (from Wikipedia):

Mao Zedong (1893–1976), the first Chairman of the Communist Party of China and leader of the People’s Republic of China for nearly 30 years, wrote poetry, starting in the 1920s, during the Red Army’s epic retreat during the Long March of 1934-1936, and after coming to power in 1949. Although Mao was radical politically, he wrote in classical Chinese forms.

Mao’s poems are in the classical Chinese verse style, rather than the newer Modern Chinese poetry style. Though Mao may not be one of the best Chinese poets, his poems are generally considered well-written and of high literary quality.

As did most Chinese intellectuals of his generation, Mao received rigorous education in Chinese classical literature, and thus his skill in poetry is of little surprise. His style was deeply influenced by the “Three Lis” of the Tang Dynasty: poets Li Bai, Li Shangyin, and Li He. He is considered to be a romantic poet, in contrast to the realist poets represented by Du Fu.

Many of Mao’s poems are frequently quoted in popular culture, literature and daily conversations. Some of his most well-known poems are “Changsha” (1925), “The Double Ninth” (1929.10), “Loushan Pass” (1935), “The Long March” (1935), “Snow” (1936.02), “The PLA Captures Nanjing” (1949.04), “Reply to Li Shuyi” (1957.05.11), and “Ode to the Plum Blossom” (1961.12).

Excerpt:

The Long March

The Red Army fears not the trials of the Long March,
Holding light ten thousand crags and torrents.
The Five Ridges wind like gentle ripples
And the majestic Wumeng roll by, globules of clay.
Warm the steep cliffs lapped by the waters of Golden Sand,
Cold the iron chains spanning the Tatu River.
Minshan’s thousand li of snow joyously crossed,
The three Armies amrch on, each face glowing.