The Comedians – Graham Greene (1966) (1st ed)

S$63.00

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The Comedians – Graham Greene (1966) (1st ed)

S$63.00

Title: The Comedians

Author: Graham Greene

Publisher: The Bodley Head, London, 1966. First edition.

Condition: Hardcover, with dust jacket. Near fine. Very, very slight wear to dust jacket and very slight foxing to foredge. Dust jacket not price-clipped. 313pp, app 8″ by 5.5″.

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SKU: greene-comedians Categories: , Tag:

Description

About the book (from Wikipedia):

The Comedians (1966) is a novel by Graham Greene. Set in Haiti under the rule of François “Papa Doc” Duvalier and his secret police, the Tonton Macoute, the novel explores the political suppression and terrorism through the figure of an English hotel owner, Brown.

The story begins as three men, Brown, Smith, an “innocent” American, and Major H. O. Jones, a confidence man, meet on a ship bound for Haiti. Brown, Smith, and Jones, their names suggesting a curious facelessness, are the “comedians” of Greene’s title. Complications include Brown’s friendship with a rebel leader, politically charged hotel guests, the manipulations of a British arms dealer, and an affair with Martha Pineda, the wife of a South American ambassador. The setting for much of the novel, the Hotel Trianon, was inspired by the Hotel Oloffson in central Port-au-Prince.

The novel was adapted as a feature film of the same name, released in 1967 and starring Richard Burton, Elizabeth Taylor, Alec Guinness, Peter Ustinov, James Earl Jones, Cicely Tyson, Paul Ford and Lillian Gish.

About the author (from Wikipedia):

Henry Graham Greene OM CH (2 October 1904 – 3 April 1991), better known by his pen name Graham Greene, was an English novelist regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. Combining literary acclaim with widespread popularity, Greene acquired a reputation early in his lifetime as a major writer, both of serious Catholic novels, and of thrillers (or “entertainments” as he termed them). He was shortlisted, in 1966 and 1967, for the Nobel Prize for Literature. Through 67 years of writings, which included over 25 novels, he explored the ambivalent moral and political issues of the modern world, often through a Catholic perspective.