The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare (1871)

S$88.00

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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare (1871)

S$88.00

Title: The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare, with copious Glossorial Notes and A Biographical Notice
Author: William Shakespeare, Robert Inglis (intro)
ISBN: –
Publisher: Gall & Inglis, 1871
Condition: Hardcover, decoartive cloth. Red cloth with extensiv

Sold out!

SKU: shakespeare-inglis Categories: ,

Description

Title: The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare, with copious Glossorial Notes and A Biographical Notice
Author: William Shakespeare, Robert Inglis (intro)
ISBN: –
Publisher: Gall & Inglis, 1871
Condition: Hardcover, decoartive cloth. Red cloth with extensive gilt on boards and all edges. Spine sunned, hinges cracked, binding firm and nicely aged. ~900 pages. A beautiful edition.

A Biographical Notice (excerpt)

Nearly all that has come down to us of the personal history of Shakespeare may be ex-
pressed in the words of one of his biographers : ” All that is known with any degree of
certainty is, that he was born at Stratford-upon-Avon married, and had children there
went to London, where he commenced actor, and wrote poems and plays returned to
Stratford, made his will, died, and was buried.” It is most remarkable of such a man as
Shakespeare, ” that no letter of his writing, no record of his conversation, no fully drawn
character of him by any contemporary has yet been discovered.” The industry of his
commentators has indeed discovered various documents in which he is mentioned, but
the information is of the most meagre kind, and the history derived from the discovery,
of a merely conjectural character.

At first sight one is disposed to imagine that, great as Shakespeare has been esteemed
since his death, possibly he may have been undervalued by his contemporaries, but
several incidental notices of him by writers of his age, show that not only were his writings
appreciated, but that his plays had introduced a new era in the progress of dramatic
literature.

So far as we can gather from the scanty facts which have been collected, Shakespeare
seems to have had a most supreme indifference as to the place he was to occupy in the
annals of literature ; he has left us no records of his own life, nor does he appear ever to
have taken the slightest trouble to have his dramas issued to the world in the state in
which he wrote them. During his lifetime, edition after edition was published of many
of his plays, unauthorised by him, and in a most imperfect and garbled form, yet he
never seems to have interfered, and at his death no authorised copy of Shakespeare’s
plays was known to have been in existence. How much of Shakespeare we have in the
generally received text is quite a matter of conjecture, and the text itself is as much a
subject of discussion as the dramas of ancient Greece. The editors of the first collected
edition of Shakespeare, the famous edition of 1623, did their duty most conscien-
tiously, but their materials were of the most uncertain character, being chiefly collected
from the manuscripts preserved in the various theatres, but not one of them bearing
the authentication of Shakespeare. In this edition twenty plays were published for the
first time.