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The History of Java – Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles

S$565.00

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The History of Java – Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles

S$565.00

Title: The History of Java
Author: Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, John Bastin (intro)
Publisher: Oxford University Press, 1982. Facsimile reprint of the first edition of 1817. Scarce.
Condition: Hardcover, grey-blue cloth with slipcase. In very good cond

Sold out!

SKU: history-of-java-stamford-raffles Categories: , , ,

Title: The History of Java
Author: Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, John Bastin (intro)
Publisher: Oxford University Press, 1982. An exact facsimile of the first edition of 1817. Scarce.
Condition: Hardcover, grey-blue cloth with slipcase. In very good condition, slight bumping to corners, a few small dents, but otherwise excellent. Slipcase has fading to the edges and some shelf-wear.

About the author and book:

Thomas Stamford Raffles (1781-1826) was a British civil servant and statesman, best known for his founding of the city (now Republic) of Singapore. After the capture of Java by the British in 1811, Raffles was appointed Lieutenant Governor of the island, a position he held until 1815. After a two-year interlude in England, he sailed back to the East, and established the city of Singapore in 1819. These volumes, written during his governorship and first published in 1817, contain his monumental survey and history of the island state. Raffles provides a comprehensive ethnographic description of the island’s society, describing its economy, trade, languages and dialects, and religious and social customs, together with a detailed history of the island, including a discussion of the introduction of Islam. These volumes provide invaluable information of the study of contemporary Javanese society and history.

Contents:

Chapter I
Geographical Situation of Java
Name
Extent and Form
Divisions
Harbours
Mountains and Volcanos
Rivers and Lakes
General Appearance of the Country
Mineralogical Constitution
Seasons and Climate
Metals. Minerals
Soil
Vegetable and Animal Kingdoms
Chapter II
Origin of the Natives
Javans compared with the Malayus and Bugis
Comparative Progress of the three Races
Foreign Influence
Persons of the Natives
Manners
Population
Inequality of it accounted for
Population Tables
Increase of Population
Foreign Settlers
Chinese
Bugis
Malayus—Moors
Arabs
Slaves
Gradations of Rank among the Javans
Their Habitations, Dress, and Food
Chapter III
Importance of Agriculture to Java
Soil
State of the Peasantry
Price of Rice
Subsistence of the Peasantry
Dwellings
Agricultural Stock
Implements of Farming
Seasons
Different Kinds of Land
Rice Cultivation
Maize, &c
Sugar
Coffee
Pepper
Indigo
Cotton
Tobacco
Tenure of landed Property
Chapter IV
Manufactures
Handicrafts
Bricks
Thatch
Mats
Cotton Cloths
Dyes
Tanning
Ropes
Metals
Boat and Ship-building
Paper
Salt
Saltpetre Works
Gunpowder, &c
Feelling and transporting of Teak Timber
Fisheries
Chapter V
Commerce
Advantageous Situation of Java for Commercial Intercourse
Importance of Batavia in particular
Native Trade
Roads and Inland Carriage
Markets—Influence of the Chinese
Coasting Trade
Exports and Imports
Trade with the Archipelago
China
Kamtchatka
Western India
Europe, &c
Dutch Commercial Regulations
State of the Eastern Islands
Advantages which they possess
Causes of the Depression of the Nations and Tribes which inhabit them
Japan Trade
Chapter VI
Character of the Inhabitants of Java
Difference between the Sundas and the Javans
The Lower Orders
The Chiefs
Nature of the Native Government
Different Officers of the State
Judicial Establishments and Institutions
Laws, and how administered
Police Institutions and Regulations
Military Establishments
Revenue
Chapter VII
Ceremonies of the Court
Deference paid to superior Rank
Regalia
Processions
Pomp
Rank and Titles
Ambassadors
Ceremonies attending Births, Marriages, and Funerals
Account of the People called Kalang, and of the Inhabitants of the Teng’ger Mountains
The Bedui
Festivals
Amusements
The Drama
Wayangs
The Dance
Tournaments
The Chase
Tiger Fights
Combat of Criminals with Tigers
Bull Fights, &c
Games of Skill and Chance
Other Customs and Usages
Chapter VIII
Language
Little known to Europeans
Different Languages or Dialects
Those of Sunda, Madura, and Bali, compared with that of Java Proper
The polite Language, or Language of Honour
The Kawi, or Sacred and Classic Language
Numerals
Chandra Sangkala
Literature
Compositions in the Kawi Language, and in the modern Javan
Influence of Hindu Literature
Introduction of Arabic Literature
Poetry
The Brata Yud’ha, a Poem
Music
Painting
Sculpture
Architecture
Arithmetic—Astronomy
Chapter IX
Religion
Introduction of Mahometanism
How far its Tenets and Doctrines are observed
Priests
How provided for
How far the ancient Institutions of the Country are superseded
Antiquities
Edifices
The Temples of Bambanan. Boro Bodo
Gunung Prahu
Kediri
Sing’a Sari, Suku, &c.
Sculpture
Images in Stone
Casts in Metal
Inscriptions on Stone and Copper
Coins
Ruins of the ancient Capitals at Medang Kamulan, Majapahit, Pajajaran, &c.
Island of Bali
Conclusion
Chapter X
The History of Java from the earliest Traditions till the Establishment of Mahometanism
Chapter XI
History of Java from the Establishment of Mahometanism (A. J. 1400), till the Arrival of the British Forces in A.D.
1811. (A. J. 1738)
Line of Mahometan Sovereigns of Java
Chronological Table of Events
Account of the several principal Divisions of Java and Madura
APPENDIX
A Unhealthiness of Batavia
B Account of the Japan Trade
C Translation of a modern Version of the Suria Alem
D Proclamation of the Governor General and Regulation passed by the Hon. the Lieutenant Governor in Council for the more effectual Administration of Justice in the Provincial Courts of Java
E A comparative Vocabulary of the Malayu, Javan, Madurese, Bali, and Lampung Languages
Extract from the Dasa Nama
Comparative Vocabulary of the Sanskrit, Kawi, and Pali
Vocabulary of Kawi Words, with the Meaning attached to them by the Panambahan of Sumenap
Specimen of the mystical Meaning attached to the Letters of the Alphabet, &c. according to the Interpretation of the Panambahan of Sumenap
F Account of the Island of Celebes
Comparative Vocabulary of the Bugis, Makasar, Mandhar, Buton, Sasak, Bima, Sembawa, Tembora, and Ende Languages
Comparative Vocabulary of the Gunung Talu, Menadu, Ternati, Sang’i, Sirang or Ceram, and Saparna Languages
G Numerals according to the Chandra Sangkala
H Translation of the Manek Maya
I Translations of Inscriptions in the ancient Javan or Kawi Character
K Account of the Island of Bali
L Proclamation declaring the Principles of the intended Change of System
Revenue Instructions
M Memorandum respecting Weights, Measures, &c