The Trial of Joan of Arc – W.S. Scott

S$56.00

Sold out!

The Trial of Joan of Arc – W.S. Scott

S$56.00

Title: The Trial of Joan of Arc, Being the verbatim report of the proceedings from the Orleans Manuscript
Author: W.S. Scott (trans., intro.)
Publisher: The Folio Society, 1956 (1st edition)
Condition: Hardcover, cloth. Lacking a slipcase. Some tanning

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Description

Title: The Trial of Joan of Arc, Being the verbatim report of the proceedings from the Orleans Manuscript
Author: W.S. Scott (trans., intro.)
Publisher: The Folio Society, 1956 (1st edition)
Condition: Hardcover, cloth. Lacking a slipcase. Some tanning, minor foxing. Unmarked. Contains black and white illustrations. Comes with a newspaper article on Joan of Arc, probably from the late 50s or early 60s.

About the book

The chapters of this book are:

1. Introduction

2. The Mission, the Victories and the Capture of Jeanne the Pucelle

3. The Trial for Lapse:

– The Formal Preiminaries

– The Preparatory Interrogations

– Trial in Ordinary

4. The Trial for Relapse

 

From the book:

‘The Orleans manuscript with which the present volume is concerned contains the most complete and accurate account of the trial of Jeanne d’Arc, and gives for the first time a report of her actual words in extenso……[it] was drawn up by command of King Louis XII and Admiral de Graville. This means that i must have been written about the year 1500…’

 

About Joan of Arc (from Wikipedia):

Joan of Arc, nicknamed “The Maid of Orléans” (French: La Pucelle d’Orléans), is a folk heroine of France and a Roman Catholic saint. She was born a peasant girl in what is now eastern France. Claiming divine guidance, she led the French army to several important victories during the Hundred Years’ War, which paved the way for the coronation of Charles VII of France. She was captured by the Burgundians, transferred to the English in exchange for money, put on trial by the pro-English Bishop of Beauvais Pierre Cauchon for charges of “insubordination and heterodoxy”,and was burned at the stake for heresy when she was 19 years old.

Twenty-five years after her execution, an inquisitorial court authorized by Pope Callixtus III examined the trial, pronounced her innocent, and declared her a martyr. Joan of Arc was beatified in 1909 and canonized in 1920. She is – along with St. Denis, St. Martin of Tours, St. Louis IX, and St. Theresa of Lisieux – one of the patron saints of France. Joan said she had received visions from God instructing her to support Charles VII and recover France from English domination late in the Hundred Years’ War. The uncrowned King Charles VII sent her to the siege of Orléans as part of a relief mission. She gained prominence when she overcame the dismissive attitude of veteran commanders and caused the lifting of the siege in only nine days. Several additional swift victories led to Charles VII’s coronation at Reims.

Joan of Arc has been a popular figure to depict since the time of her death and many famous writers, filmmakers and composers who have created works about her. Cultural depictions of Joan of Arc have continued in film, theatre, television, video games, music, and performances to this day.

 

About the Trial (from Wikipedia):

The Trial of Joan of Arc, which took place before an English-backed church court at Rouen, France in the first half of the year 1431 was one of the more famous trials in history, the subject of many books and movies. It culminated in the execution of the person known to history as Joan of Arc, the young French peasant girl who was the defendant in the case. The trial verdict would later be reversed on appeal by the Inquisitor-General in 1456, thereby completely exonerating her. She is now a French national heroine and saint of the Roman Catholic Church.

The life of Joan of Arc is one of the best documented of her era. This is especially remarkable when one considers that she was not an aristocrat but rather a peasant girl. In one of history’s genuine ironies, this fact is due partly to the trial record kept by the same individuals who attempted to eradicate her name from memory, and partly due also to the records of the later appeal of her case after the war when the trial was investigated and its verdict was overturned.

During the investigation and trial itself, a trio of notaries headed by chief notary Guillaume Manchon, took notes in French which were then collated each day following the trial session. About four years later, these records were translated into Latin by Manchon and University of Paris master Thomas de Courcelles. Five copies were produced, three of which are still in existence.

Jules Quicherat published the first unabridged version of the trial record in the first volume of his 5 volume Proces de condamnation et de rehabilitation de Jeanne d’Arc in Paris in the 1840s. But it was not until 1932 that the first unabridged English translation became available when W.P. Barrett published his Trial of Joan of Arc in New York.