Thoughts on Life and Religion – Max Müller (1915)

S$73.00

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Thoughts on Life and Religion – Max Müller (1915)

S$73.00

Title: Thoughts on Life and Religion
Author: Friedrich Max Müller
Publisher: Constable & Company, 1915
Condition: Hardcover, pocket size. In excellent condition for its age. A quote by Tennyson on blank fly leaf in very beautiful script. Text clean, bi

Sold out!

SKU: muller-lifereligion Categories: ,

Description

Title: Thoughts on Life and Religion
Author: Friedrich Max Müller
Publisher: Constable & Company, 1915
Condition: Hardcover, pocket size. In excellent condition for its age. A quote by Tennyson on blank fly leaf in a very beautiful script. Text clean, binding tight.

About the author (from Wikipedia):

Friedrich Max Müller (6 December 1823 – 28 October 1900), generally known as Max Müller, was a German-born philologist and Orientalist, who lived and studied in Britain for most of his life. He was one of the founders of the western academic field of Indian studies and the discipline of comparative religion. Müller wrote both scholarly and popular works on the subject of Indology and the Sacred Books of the East, a 50-volume set of English translations, was prepared under his direction. He also put forward and promoted the idea of a Turanian family of languages and Turanian people.

About the book:

Fragments of Max Müller’s previously unpublished thoughts on life and religion, compiled by his wife. Contains some thought-provoking views on life and religion, including on such topics as The Art of Life, Christ, knowledge, language and love.

“Faith is that organ of knowledge by which we apprehend the Infinite, namely, whatever transcends the ken of our senses and the grasp of our reason.”

“There is no lesson which at the present time seems more important than to learn that in every religion there are precious grains; that we must draw in every religion a broad distinction between what is essential and what is not, between the eternal and the temporary, between the divine and the human, and that though the non-essential may fill many volumes, the essential can often be comprehended in a few words, but words on which hang all the law and the prophets.”